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News: 70 YEARS OF THE SUNBEAM-TALBOT 90

There are those cars that possess an innate sense of dash – cars such as the Sunbeam-Talbot 90. You can imagine Leslie Phillips or Terry-Thomas driving one to Goodwood or Henley, the hood down on the drop, the sliding roof open on the saloon, overtaking Ford Consuls and Vauxhall Wyverns with zest and élan.

News: DO YOU REMEMBER – THE SUNBEAM STILETTO?

The year is 1967, and your dilemma is a) craving a new Porsche 911 while b) having a most unsympathetic bank manager. Fortunately, the Rootes Group had just launched a new car ‘for men whose wives think they’ve given up sports cars’. The advertisement further invited the reader to ‘show her how luxuriously saloon it is – four deep seats, the front ones reclining, plenty of room, and swish twin headlamps’.

News: DO YOU REMEMBER - THE SUNBEAM HARRINGTON ALPINE?

In the years immediately before the launch of the MGB GT in 1965, a sports car enthusiast who craved greater weather protection for winter had a limited choice. None of the “Big Five” manufacturers offered a sleek 2+2 tourer with the partial exception of the Consul Capri GT. However, the sort of motorist who favoured flat hats and club blazers would probably have regarded the Ford as transport for flashy types who used too much aftershave.

News: THE CAR FROM THE TWILIGHT ZONE – THE CHRYSLER HUNTER

There are some cars which seem to hail from a strange twilight zone of motoring; those models that enjoy a form of afterlife for quite a period after they were believed to have ceased production.

News: An Arresting Triumph - Southend-on-Sea Police's TR4

The summer of 1962 and you are cruising down the A127 towards Southend-on-Sea in your new Sunbeam Alpine Series II. The hood is down, the sun is shining, and you are wearing a particularly tasteful cravat. In short, you have not a care in the world until you hear the unmistakable sound of a police car bell – only the vehicle seen in the rear view mirror is not an Austin Westminster but a Triumph TR4…

News: 70 YEARS OF THE AUSTIN A90 ATLANTIC

Imagine you were paying a visit to Earls Court in 1948, revelling in Britain’s first Motor Show for a decade. Naturally, your head would have been turned by the Jaguar XK120, the Morris Minor, the Sunbeam-Talbot 90 and the other new vehicle while on the Austin display is an open tourer which featured a power-operated top.

News: Disappearing Classics

British roads see thousands of new cars each and every year, however, recent reports have suggested that some Classic Cars, which are still fresh in our memories, are facing extinction and nearing their end. A report by MSN Cars deduces that many cherished cars such as the Vauxhall Chevette, Talbot Sunbeam and Lada Riva, vehicles which once stole our hearts, have begun to see their numbers dwindle in recent years.

News: THE DAIHATSU COMPAGNO – THE FIRST JAPANESE CAR SOLD IN BRITAIN

In 1964 the average motoring enthusiast would have been forgiven for overlooking the news that the Daihatsu Compagno was soon to be officially available in the UK. This was, after all, the year of the Sunbeam Tiger, the 4.2-litre Jaguars E-Type and Mk. X, the Austin 1800, the Vanden Plas Princess 4-Litre R and the Humber Imperial.

News: ENVOY; A VAUXHALL FOR CANADA

The overseas marketing of a British car under a different name is a widespread phenomenon. US motorists were offered the ‘Austin Marina’ and Triumph badged Standards while Chrysler promoted the Hillman Avenger as the ‘Plymouth Cricket’.

News: THE ORIGINAL TOYOTA CELICA; A CELEBRATION

One of the many highlights of this year’s Lancaster Insurance Classic Motor Show was the opportunity to marvel at the first-generation Celica. In the early seventies, the Toyota appeared to stand apart from the offered Ford Capri Mk. I, Sunbeam Rapier, Vauxhall Firenza or MGB GT, a scaled-down Mustang for a very reasonable price. And that was precisely its raison d’être.

News: 20 brilliant buys from the '70s

The 1970s brought us some fabulous cars – many of them now undisputed classics commanding huge fees on the used car market. However, a whole other tranche of '70s motors are now nudging towards classic status, yet still relatively affordable.

News: IT WAS A DIFFERENT WORLD – TWENTY FACTS ABOUT LIFE IN 1952

1) There were circa 2.5 million cars on the road in 1952. 2) Only one in twenty Britons had access to a car. 3) Some British car marques of 1952 that are no longer with us: Armstrong Siddeley, Austin, Hillman, Humber, Jowett, Morris, Singer, Standard, Sunbeam-Talbot, Triumph, Riley and Wolseley.